Science articles for the week.

The goal is to have your student read and write. Whether it is fiction or non-fiction, the goal remains the same. I use nonfiction for my son – he likes to read about science. Reading about science also exposes him to a wide variety of vocabulary words and interesting punctuation. He reads enough fiction on his own and with me during reading time.

In addition, he’s learning about random topics while reading non-fiction. He loves all things science, and so reading about science helps him learn even more about a topic he already loves. If he had to read about dance or ponies, he probably wouldn’t do it as often. Lastly, by choosing articles that I know he will like, I don’t have to argue with him about doing the reading portion of the work. Sometimes we still argue about the writing – but we never have an argument about the reading.

Here’s the list of articles we’ve been using:

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140709140117.htm

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/duck-billed-dinosaurs-roamed-arctic-herds

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140709140111.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140709135914.htm

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/fossils-reveal-largest-airborne-bird

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140702165520.htm

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/07/140710081208.htm

 

Advertisements

Summer writing practice.

We’ve been doing schoolwork over this summer. Yes, I’m one of those moms. I don’t believe that the school year exists for any good reason. I think learning can, and should, be done year round. I certainly don’t think that it’s a good idea to take months off of practice.

If we were talking about professional sports people, they don’t take months off of practice. They might cross train, but they certainly don’t take breaks for months at a time. Not and be good at what they do.

I want my kids to be professional learners. Therefore we might cross train, but we don’t take time off.

Some skills that are easily deterioratable (yes, I made up my own word) are: Math, reading, and writing. Those are the skills we practice everyday. Without fail. Anything else we just learn as we go. Museums, hikes, shopping – these are all things we do to learn. But math, reading, and writing we do everyday.

Nicholas practice reading and writing the same way he did over the school year. I find science articles, or articles about the World Cup (he’s obsessed). He then reads then and writes a sentence summarizing the article.

Abby doesn’t like that method of learning. She hasn’t learned to write all her letters yet, and would prefer I just leave her alone with her paints and paper thank you. She would rather not participate in learning her letters and numbers. But that’s too bad. Sometimes I’m the mean mom and force her to spend 10 minutes, yes 10 minutes, doing something I need her to do.

I’ve bragged about Confessions of a Homeschooler before – and how much I love her stuff. She has some neat writing and number practice sheets too. I’ve downloaded these and put them into folders. Abby’s job is to pick one of each (one number and one letter) out each morning. When the folder is empty, I refill it. Sometimes I add extras before they are all gone.

Why do I let her pick? Well, she has to do it. So letting her have a choice in what she practices is important. She gets all her numbers and letters practiced – which is why I try not to refill them before they are empty. Otherwise we would practice the letter A and number 3 all year long. Instead she has to pick from what is available, and do the work.

I also let her do it with crayons or markers. I don’t care what she writes with, so long as she practices.

This way we all get some say in the work that gets done, while still getting the work done that needs to be done.

Number practice sheets

Writing practice sheets

%d bloggers like this: